Complete newbie

General posting
Leader
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Apr 14, 2017 7:11 pm
KAYAK: Looking
Location: Cornwall
Contact:

Complete newbie

Postby Leader » Fri Apr 14, 2017 7:23 pm

Hi all,

As the title suggests, I'm new to all this. I've done a couple of sea kayaking trips whilst on holiday and now my partner and I would like to invest in a kayak for future kayaking fun! We'd like to be able to take it with us when we go away in the motorhome so initially we thought about getting an inflatable but the more I read the more confused I get. This is where I'm hoping to glean some helpful pointers from the experts (you!). So far I've gone around in circles between:

1) get an inflatable tandem
2) get a rigid tandem
3) get two rigid solos

The problems are that a) I don't want to get blown away b) I don't want a kayak so heavy we struggle to carry it or get it on the roof

This leads me towards option 3 but it would be nice to have a tandem....

We don't have a big budget but I also don't want to end up with a cheap crappy boat that will be more difficult to paddle. Any help with brands to look for/avoid would also be helpful.

Thanks in advance!

Floater
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Nov 19, 2016 12:45 pm
KAYAK: looking
Location: Sydney
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Floater » Sat Apr 15, 2017 10:50 pm

The joke is a tandem is called the Divorce Boat.
Is one person an invalid or tied up holding a movie camera old school instead of a gopro mount?
Actually easier to paddle side by side for a chat than one in front of the other.
Lifting a tandem is hard. Onto a campervan harder.
Tandems suck. IMO.
Get single kayaks.

User avatar
NorthSIKer
Posts: 67
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2017 8:06 pm
KAYAK: Mirage 582, Kaskazi Skua
Location: North Queensland
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby NorthSIKer » Mon Apr 17, 2017 3:55 pm

Floater wrote:Tandems suck. IMO.
Get single kayaks.


+1

annie1948
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat May 27, 2017 6:05 am
KAYAK: Delta 12.10
Location: Victoria
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby annie1948 » Sat May 27, 2017 6:18 am

Hi ..I have just posted my Kayak 12.10 For sale with accessories ..Very light weight easy to handle ..Im tiny but still able to load the kayak on to my roof racks ..If you're interested feel free to touch base

Mac50L
Posts: 275
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:31 pm
KAYAK: Mac50L
Location: Canterbury, New Zealand
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Mac50L » Sun May 28, 2017 1:17 pm

Loading - make / fit a bar that sticks out sideways from the rear roof rack bar. Lift the aft end of the kayak on to the bar. Lift the other end on to the rack, into its cradle. Pull down and swing the aft end into the cradle. It should be quite easy to load a double on to a vehicle solo.

I mention the extension bar on the rear rack because there is usually more kayak ahead of the front rack, hanging over the bonnet so you are lifting right at the stern for the first lift.

Tie the kayak to the vehicle, inverted V to the front, maybe just one tie to the tow hitch, but not to the rack. Yes, you can put extra ties to the rack but they aren't the important ones, just secondary back-up fastenings.

However, after all of that, if lifting on to a motorhome, you are going to need sets of steps and make the lift in two stages, first lift on to short steps at each end, second lift, you on steps, to the roof.

Tandem or singles - I've used both, tandem round Fiji (longest trip of 38 days), lots of trips with beginners and solo-lifting it on to a car or Ford Econovan. Also paddled singles for many years.

Leader
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Apr 14, 2017 7:11 pm
KAYAK: Looking
Location: Cornwall
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Leader » Thu Jun 22, 2017 5:37 pm

Thanks for your replies, after giving it more thought (and based on the opinions of experiences paddlers) I've decided that single kayaks are the right option. I'm now researching a good used kayak that doesn't break the bank as I've read that cheap ones are a complete waste of money. Thanks again.

Boatsie
Posts: 136
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2017 3:02 pm
KAYAK: Nadgee Wanderer, 70s glass 15 ft, 2 Winner Otiums
Location: Adelaide
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Boatsie » Thu Jun 22, 2017 11:32 pm

Hey bro,
Not sure about currency. If in Australia, a cheap glass and you can't go wrong. Eg down here, $50-$150 and a cockpit that fits.
I have similar in shed, love it much, no rudder nor skeg, just deck lines and a hole to sit in. At worst might need repair which is as simple as a wet of epoxy and a paper of glass.
I think decent plastics are dearer.

Boatsie
Posts: 136
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2017 3:02 pm
KAYAK: Nadgee Wanderer, 70s glass 15 ft, 2 Winner Otiums
Location: Adelaide
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Boatsie » Fri Jun 23, 2017 12:14 am

Just expanding on that. I have cheap plastics and they deform easy. My relatives use ABS and they strong as. Repretable manufactures using 3 layer seem great too. I think you guys have more rocks than us.
I'm stoked with my used polyester girl, she hard as and much faster, quicker and seaworthy than my plastics although shorter and wider. They cost nearer nothing than the longer boats with hatchs yet won't sink(foam filled) , lunch gets thrown in the cockpit and hopefully come with skirt /paddles. Ideal for short km days(not knowing your currents/waves). Mine has lots of patchs and due for some more. Quality duct tape lasts ages. Epoxy sticks quick and easy and from past having snapped boats; a layer of epoxy chop strand is tougher and boat snaps the other side of that. Repairs are as easy as letting it dry first.
I'm just upgrading now with distance days in mind and love that boat because we usually seek flat water and she is so easy to assist during pilot error hence my old mate should love her much more than as he puts it, ' the cramp barges. '
I guess she about 14-15ft plumb ends, very round, looks like she would spin in circles yet actually tracks well. When I get around to it I will spend $50 on her to reseal her before water finds internal resin routes and use her in 2-4 foot chop. She was used in those conditions before I saw her. A real simple lovely boat. Ideal for same day in same day out and rock solid in small stuff.
Deck lines make life so easy when 2 of you are playing.

Boatsie
Posts: 136
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2017 3:02 pm
KAYAK: Nadgee Wanderer, 70s glass 15 ft, 2 Winner Otiums
Location: Adelaide
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Boatsie » Fri Jun 23, 2017 1:40 am

http://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/Fibreglass-Cano ... Ciid%253A1

Similar to this. As long as she's hard she'll be alright. I wouldn't have a clue regarding deck lines retrofitting though. I'm no expert nor highly experienced paddler yet I find that style of boat highly fun.
To my best knowledge if any scratches or chunks down to fibre cloth exist or become just let dry and cover with epoxy cloth to keep structure free from moisture. As written before, repairs were stronger than original and I guess 1/2hr-2hrs.
Others would/should/do know more about whether above kayak is lumpy or flat water capable. Like most, if I could turn back time I would have seeked similar. We have lots of sandy beach flat water here.

Leader
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Apr 14, 2017 7:11 pm
KAYAK: Looking
Location: Cornwall
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Leader » Fri Jun 23, 2017 5:07 am

Wow, that one's cheap as chips. Thanks for the tips, I thought I'd have to fork out hundreds! I'll keep my eye one this one and snap it up if it doesn't go too high.

Boatsie
Posts: 136
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2017 3:02 pm
KAYAK: Nadgee Wanderer, 70s glass 15 ft, 2 Winner Otiums
Location: Adelaide
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Boatsie » Fri Jun 23, 2017 10:02 am

A pleasure. That boat looks faster than mine, hence might be tippy. Similar boat with Max beam near the seat is what I use. One of you might prefer one style more than the other.
Always found that if I like the cockpit I like the waterways that particular hulls aloud me.
Have best luck friend

Boatsie
Posts: 136
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2017 3:02 pm
KAYAK: Nadgee Wanderer, 70s glass 15 ft, 2 Winner Otiums
Location: Adelaide
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Boatsie » Fri Jun 23, 2017 4:06 pm

Should you obtain a boat/ or boats, that are absent of paddles, quality paddles are worth the extra. I've watched mine flutter wave goodbye into depth and it sux. I'm fairly new too, I like the fibre glass sticks/blades as they seem best bang for ya buck.
Remembering that water, air and electricity share a fundamental; easy path. Worth while skills might learn quickly by only touching blade with water and air.
Yet again, seems to rain a lot there, maybe chance of lightning struck tree to carve knot free Greenland club is greater. That might be hard enough to club shallow banks with. I only use paddles.
Best wishes with your voyages.

Boatsie
Posts: 136
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2017 3:02 pm
KAYAK: Nadgee Wanderer, 70s glass 15 ft, 2 Winner Otiums
Location: Adelaide
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Boatsie » Sun Jun 25, 2017 7:45 pm

20170625_164304_009.jpg


That's my girl. Simple with deck lines.

I write too much. The above boat is light easy roof rack, sea sturdy and paces give or take with lovely cruise speed. Our local tide race is about 3knots. She cuts headway there. Don't worry if mix match boats. Will be using above with a couple of flared bow 5m and a plumb bow 5.5m and be cruising at same pace.

I would choose decklines over no decklines if choice is there.
Best luck friends..
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Boatsie
Posts: 136
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2017 3:02 pm
KAYAK: Nadgee Wanderer, 70s glass 15 ft, 2 Winner Otiums
Location: Adelaide
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Boatsie » Thu Jun 29, 2017 2:41 am

Hey brother, might be useful, might not knot.
If your new to the water, a kayak wide in centre less intimidating with balance then wide aft(behind) of seat. Just as much fun. Sort of hit N miss on integrities such as specifics of Hull/deck design yet pedantic vagueness is often the most from they whom are of true expertise. I swam a lot at first when in a paddle boat so kinda believe people don't mind swimming a few weeks neither.
If one of you are a housemaid partner with spare time, a yard or a metre of rope from a marine chandelier is a worthy investment. Braiding 3 strand for example through a key ring and a float doesn't cost much; a couple of ₤. Rewards include a better state of mind in case of emergency or rescue as well as found keys. Lol.
Best thing is you can chat with the store person, touch the ropes and choose a cut of that which you like feel of.
How'd the speed machine on eBay go? Pros and cons include might swim a lot at first in that style and waves not much for a long time vs 20 quid.
Deck lines on at least one of the boats would be very useful

Mac50L
Posts: 275
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:31 pm
KAYAK: Mac50L
Location: Canterbury, New Zealand
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Mac50L » Thu Jun 29, 2017 9:00 am

Boatsie wrote:Hey brother, might be useful, might not knot.

Yes, knowing your knots is a good idea. Reef, bowline, and various hitches.
I swam a lot at first when in a paddle boat so kinda believe people don't mind swimming a few weeks neither.

Some of us have never had that problem and neither did my daughter. My son did, a "rip & bust" attitude.
If one of you are a housemaid partner with spare time, a yard or a metre of rope from a marine chandelier is a worthy investment. Braiding 3 strand for example through a key ring and a float doesn't cost much;

Why take keys with you or why have them above deck if you do take them?
Deck lines on at least one of the boats would be very useful

As far as rope goes, decklines are the "safety belts" of the kayak. Every kayak should have them, not just one of them.

Boatsie
Posts: 136
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2017 3:02 pm
KAYAK: Nadgee Wanderer, 70s glass 15 ft, 2 Winner Otiums
Location: Adelaide
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Boatsie » Thu Jun 29, 2017 11:58 am

1 happy chappy.
Kids might need keys for more food. A hypocritical fan of floating keys here.
Just been to rope shop. Very happy. A quality nylon 2metre offcut and a shiny stainless ring to splice into it. Cost $3.
Not being able to afford roof racks or club membership for at least a month, quite happy self debating which girl friend gets it. A necklace and bracelet or a long loop with an attached stainless ring.
I'm with you Mac regarding knots. I'm basic though, if you have time to knot knot, a twine attached float makes a useful tool.

Mac50L
Posts: 275
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:31 pm
KAYAK: Mac50L
Location: Canterbury, New Zealand
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Mac50L » Sat Jul 01, 2017 12:54 pm

Boatsie wrote:A quality nylon 2metre offcut and a shiny stainless ring to splice into it. Cost $3.

Sounds a bit expensive.
Not being able to afford roof racks or club membership for at least a month,

Our sea kayaking "club" has been going for about 27 years. No fees, no constitution, no elected officers. It has monthly evening meetings with a speaker, annual training weekend, training evenings during the year, organised trips - all FREE. Members? E-mails to ~380 people.

Roof racks - you can get away without them or find some chuck-outs. If no racks, foam blocks shaped and tied to the kayak. The kayak tied at its ends to the vehicle (much safer than tied to a rack).

Boatsie
Posts: 136
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2017 3:02 pm
KAYAK: Nadgee Wanderer, 70s glass 15 ft, 2 Winner Otiums
Location: Adelaide
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Boatsie » Sat Jul 01, 2017 9:25 pm

Love your style Mac. Was carrying direct on roof. Worked for a year. Keyless entry lol etc led to upgrade scored a fiberglass flat top roof on next ride (with less dents). Ubolts, small bits of timber and round bars spaced to suit my 'yaks worked a year or two. Wrote that off. Now a flimsy roof cheapy and my glass skills not so good. Figured getting u beaut bars and when she rusts out I'll keep the bars (I have cradles, might even bolt them direct with four/six eyes although doubt that due to width).
Not long now, just hanging to use the tidal runs. Old mans car and racks tomorrow to get boat home, some epoxy glass to cover hole, some untying knots to remove carry handles that dangle and a few splice tucks to rearrange handles into a tidy efficient day boat blend.
Next weekend probably splice fore red and green cord to help old mate with Port and Starboard in the future.
I'd be interested in annual weekend training meetings. You guys are ocean. Pacific meaning peaceful, I guess the old old days might have been ' their he goes, peace from him now he ain't coming back. '
Is membership international?
Worst we have here in our protected waters gulf St Vincent is a mini me version of a Delta wave impact zone. I avoid there because in perfect conditions (eg worst) that's slab city and the blankets weigh many tonne.

I won't rub ewe up about the sheep bro bcos one of your good mates reminds me about how we sing brag about tying the Kangaroos down, sport.

Mac50L
Posts: 275
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:31 pm
KAYAK: Mac50L
Location: Canterbury, New Zealand
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Mac50L » Sat Jul 01, 2017 10:00 pm

Boatsie wrote:I'd be interested in annual weekend training meetings.

Annual weekend training usually about the end of January, beginning of February. The only fees are the camp ground fees. A whole range of training - rescues, surf, paddling, fitting out a kayak, etc. etc. That part has been running about 22 or more years. The most qualified instructors down to unqualified but totally experienced. All FREE (except for camp ground fees if camping over night).
You guys are ocean. Pacific meaning peaceful,

Not always and not with southerly gales and Cook Strait ferries being cancelled. The equivalent of cancelling the Bass Strait ferry. Fortunately Banks Peninsula has very long sheltered bays so we don't always have to be out in the ocean.
Is membership international?

All that's needed is an e-mail address to qualify. A notice of meetings and possibly a short bit about something each month.
The website -
http://www.sporty.co.nz/canterburyseakayak/
The national NZ one, KASK (Kiwi Association of Sea Kayakers) -
http://www.kask.org.nz/
A lot of information on this site.

Boatsie
Posts: 136
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2017 3:02 pm
KAYAK: Nadgee Wanderer, 70s glass 15 ft, 2 Winner Otiums
Location: Adelaide
Contact:

Re: Complete newbie

Postby Boatsie » Sat Jul 01, 2017 11:43 pm

Thank you. Our Southern ✝

Not knowing I always believed that our fore fathers named the Pacific because they had a best sense of humour seeing it's our largest ocean. Lol. 30+m high waves not uncommon. Ferry cancellation conditions must be pretty awesome to view. Researching web sites now. 4 foot storm waves down here suit me bro :D
Thank you again with the web sites.


Return to “CHIT-CHAT”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest